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Officials say they’ve succeeded in stopping violent protests for now in Minneapolis

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- Officials in Minneapolis say they’ve succeeded for now in stopping the violent protests that ravaged parts of the city for several days after the death of George Floyd.

Police, state troopers and National Guard members moved in to break up protests after an 8 p.m. curfew took effect, firing tear gas and rubber bullets to clear streets outside a police precinct and elsewhere. The show of force came after three days where police mostly declined to engage with protesters.

It also came after the state poured in more than 4,000 National Guard members and said the number would soon rise to nearly 11,000.

As Minneapolis streets appeared largely quiet, Corrections Commissioner Paul Schnell said the heavy response would remain as long as it takes to “quell this situation.”

Floyd, a handcuffed black man, died after a Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck for several minutes.

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Associated Press

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