Skip to Content

St. Louis County plow drivers reject final contract proposal

Remaining Ad Time Ad - 00:00

DULUTH,MN-- The St. Louis county plow drivers have rejected the county's contract offer in today's vote, moving them closer to a strike.

DULUTH,MN-- The St. Louis county plow drivers have rejected the county's contract offer in today's vote, moving them closer to a strike.

Teamsters Local 3-20 and the county spent over 11 hours in negotiations meeting Friday.

The county's contract proposal offered a base wage increase of 2% plus an additional $0.55 cents per hour in 2020 and 2.25% in 2021.

The parties reached tentative agreements on the majority of the items but one sticking point was the sick leave accrual.

The county agreed to increase maximum sick leave accrual from 1,250 to 1,350 hours but rejected the union's request of a maximum of 1,500 hours.

In a statement released by the county, County Administrator Kevin Gray it was a solid proposal.

St. Louis County Administrator Kevin Gray said, "It's disappointing that the outcome got to this point, that they rejected what was a very solid and economic proposal from the county. It was one that was respectful of their positions and concerns. And it was fair to the taxpayers. We focus on the economics and try to be responsive to teamster concerns and we thought we had addressed that."

County officials say if the plows are needed they have a plan in place to make sure the roads are taken care of.

Gray adds the public's safety is the top priority.

The Teamsters also released a statement in response it says they will no longer tolerate second class benefits.

One of the biggest items of negotiation was the plow drivers being able to change their health insurance benefits.

Representative Erik Skoog says the change to benefits would now mean other medical coverage wasn't offered.

Skoog says, “The County’s final offer may appear generous in the short term. “But the offer would no longer cover the cost of dental care should the employees elect to switch to a more affordable health insurance plan.”

KBJR logo

Emma Quinn

Skip to content